A Pressing New Exposure Zone – 9/11 First Responders

The attacks on 9/11 required the help of hundreds of firefighters and other emergency and rescue workers. It also resulted in the loss of countless lives, including 343 brave firefighters. Unfortunately, those who survived the attacks may still face health issues associated with the attacks.

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Who Can File A Lawsuit For Asbestos Exposure?

Many different people can seek mesothelioma compensation after getting a clinical diagnosis including:

  • People Exposed to Asbestos at Work
  • Military Veterans Exposed While Serving our Country
  • Those Exposed to Asbestos Products
  • Mesothelioma Patients that are Victims of Second-Hand Asbestos Exposure
  • Anyone Diagnosed with Mesothelioma

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Asbestos Exposure In The Military

Asbestos was an integral part of the U.S. military for much of the 20th century because of its ability to insulate and fireproof – a lifesaving quality during wartime that ensured those serving their country were safe inside their vessels.

  • Veterans Exposure To Asbestos Facts

    • Branch of military at highest risk: U.S. Navy
    • Veterans with mesothelioma: 30 percent of all cases
    • Asbestos-related deaths: 10,000 veterans annually
      Peak years for military asbestos use: 1935 to 1975
    • Asbestos products in Navy ships: More than 300

  • Asbestos In The Navy

    The U.S. Navy covered its ships from bow to stern with asbestos products, utilizing their effective fireproofing qualities, but effectively exposing everyone on board to the toxic material. Navy veterans today are paying the price for those manufacturing decisions. Nearly one-third of people who develop mesothelioma are veterans, and a majority of those have a Navy service record.

    The worst areas for exposure were below-deck compartments like boiler rooms, engine rooms, ammunition storage rooms, and even mess halls and sleeping quarters. Asbestos paint covered these ships. As ships aged, the paint flaked and asbestos fibers became airborne and inhaled.

  • Asbestos In The Marine Corps

    Marines were most vulnerable to exposure through the armored vehicles, planes and ships that transported them to battle zones, although even the bases where they lived and trained were problematic as well.

    Like counterparts in the Navy and Army, mechanics and repairmen were among the service members who unknowingly worked with friable asbestos in the form of airborne dust and particles.

  • Asbestos In The Army

    Service members from the U.S. Army were exposed to asbestos fibers throughout much of the 20th century, mostly in buildings where they ate, slept and worked. Asbestos materials covered pipes and were in flooring and roofing materials. They were also part of the insulation and the cement foundations.

    While the use of asbestos in new construction ended by the late 1970s, it remained present in Army installations decades later. It was among the top contaminants at 32 Army bases that were closed or realigned at the end of the century, requiring $1 billion in environmental cleanup.

  • Asbestos In The US Air Force

    The history of exposure in the U.S. Air Force includes planes, radar stations and bases where the men and women were stationed. Asbestos made an ideal insulating material in aircraft, which needed heat protection in the cockpit; heat shields and overall insulation. Valves, gaskets, electrical wiring and brakes were covered in asbestos.

    Air Force mechanics were especially at risk, inhaling the fibers even during routine maintenance. Pilots who flew the aircraft were vulnerable, too, after sitting in a cockpit covered with an asbestos coating.

  • Asbestos In The US Coast Guard

    Members of the U.S. Coast Guard, like those in all branches of military service, often were exposed to asbestos, the naturally occurring mineral that was used so liberally through much of the 20th century. Although health hazards of asbestos were known as early as the World War II era, the wondrous qualities it possessed – heat resistance, durability, affordability – made it particularly invaluable on vessels built for the Navy and the Coast Guard. Since the threat of fire was such a pressing concern aboard vessels, the risks of asbestos exposure were ignored by those implementing its use.

    It was used in gaskets, boiler room equipment, pumps, turbines, electrical insulation, pipes and plumbing. All areas surrounding the engine and boiler rooms were insulated with asbestos. The ropes used throughout ships were woven with asbestos fibers. Many sections of ships were coated with asbestos insulation, which served as a valuable fire retardant.

Asbestos Exposure By State

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